CC2 Perspective Pro
Stairs Sample

To draw this style stairs you will need to first determine the number of steps you need for the tower based on the circumference of the tower and the height to the next floor. Normal stairs have a rise (distance up) of 7-9' and a tread (depth of step) of 12'. Curved stairs have a tread of about 16' along the outside edge or 9' along the inside edge.

Using a 20' diameter tower which has about a 60' circumference with 12' between floors. (Do not forget to add the thickness of the upper floor.) Every three steps would rise about 2'-3' and cover about 4' of the wall. To go up 12' it would take 15 steps. (144'/9'=16 take away one for the upper floor which leaves you with 15 steps.) 15 steps would cover about 20' of wall space or a 1/3 of the way around the tower. (15/3 steps per 4' of Wall equals 5. Multiple 5x4'=20') This means you would need a Regular Polygon of 45 sides.

Draw the Regular Polygon with Ortho on (use relative coordinates to make sure it is close to 10' radius.) Draw the inner Polygon using the same center and along the same Ortho Line making the inner polygon at -3' to -5', again using relative coordinates. Draw the treads using the Endpoint Modifier to pick up the endpoints of the sides of the Regular Polygons. Erase the inner Polygon and Project the remaining Entities. You can Rotate all the Entities if you need to adjust the location of the stairs prior to
the projection.

Extrude each step starting with the lowest. Use relative coordinates to determine each height. A rise of 9' has the pattern of... (x'-0', x'-9', x+1'-6', x+2'-3', x+3'-0'). Send the higher steps behind the lower steps You will not need to do this for all the steps, only until you reach the backside of circular area. The actual Steps and number of steps will depend on your Projection and position of Steps. Change the outer Polygon to the desired Floor Fill and send behind the steps using back or by fronting the steps.

Open Stairs

This method is the same as the solid steps, with one change and one additional step. The change begins when you are extruding. I would recommend changing the Wall Fill when doing the Steps.

To draw this style stairs you will need to first determine the number of steps you need for the tower based on the circumference of the tower and the height to the next floor. Normal stairs have a rise (distance up) of 7-9' and a tread (depth of step) of 12'. Curved stairs have a tread of about 16' along the outside edge or 9' along the inside edge.

Using a 20' diameter tower which has about a 60' circumference with 12' between floors. (Do not forget to add the thickness of the upper floor.) Every three steps would rise about 2'-3' and cover about 4' of the wall. To go up 12' it would take 15 steps. (144'/9'=16 take away one for the upper floor which leaves you with 15 steps.) 15 steps would cover about 20' of wall space or a 1/3 of the way around the tower. (15/3 steps per 4' of Wall equals 5. Multiple 5x4'=20') This means you would need a Regular Polygon of 45 sides.

Draw the Regular Polygon with Ortho on (use relative coordinates to make sure it is close to 10' radius.) Draw the inner Polygon using the same center and along the same Ortho Line making the inner polygon at -3' to -5', again using relative coordinates. Draw the treads using the Endpoint Modifier to pick up the endpoints of the sides of the Regular Polygons. Erase the inner Polygon and Project the remaining Entities. You can Rotate all the Entities if you need to adjust the location of the stairs prior to
the projection.

Extrude each step starting with the lowest. Use relative coordinates to determine each height. Extrude the first step 9', and extrude each additional step individually 1'-1 1/2'. Then use Move to raise each of the steps after the first so the top is 9' above the previous step. If you move from the top edge of each step you will follow the pattern of... (x'-0', x'-9', x+1'-6', x+2'-3', x+3'-0') starting at the second step. Send the higher steps behind the lower steps You will not need to do this for all the steps, only until you reach the backside of circular area. The actual Steps and number of steps will depend on your Projection and position of Steps. Change the outer Polygon to the desired Floor Fill and send behind the steps using back or by fronting the steps.

Inside Stairs

To draw inside stairs you will need one step for every rise. Normal stairs have a rise (distance up) of 7-9' and a tread (depth of step) of 12'. Curved stairs have a tread of about 16' along the outside edge or 9' along the inside edge. You will never have more than 12 to 15, since they will start overlapping above that and you will need to make them open steps.

Draw the Regular Polygon with Ortho on (use relative coordinates to make sure it is close to 3' to 5' greater than the center column's radius.) Draw the inner Polygon using the same center and along the same Ortho Line making the inner polygon at -3' to -5', again using relative coordinates. Draw the treads using the Endpoint Modifier to pick up the endpoints of the sides of the Regular Polygons. Erase the outer Polygon and Project the inner polygon for your column.

Extrude each step starting with the lowest. Use relative coordinates to determine each height. Extrude the first step 9', and extrude each additional step individually 1'-1 1/2' for open steps and an additional 9' for solid steps. (the above example makes use of both.) You will want to start these on the back side so you can access each tread before the one in front of it is drawn. You will need to send some of the steps behind the column, but if you start in the back you should not have to do this with any of the steps. Then use Move to raise each of any open steps after the first step or the last solid step so the top is 9' above the previous step. If you move from the top edge of each step you will follow the pattern of... (x'-0', x'-9', x+1'-6', x+2'-3', x+3'-0') starting at the second step. The actual Steps and number of steps will depend on your Projection and position of Steps. Draw a circle or project a Polygon for the floor with the desired Floor Fill and send behind the steps and column using back or by fronting the steps.

Spiral Stairs

This was done by doing one set, then copying the rest. I still needed to go and move the back steps behind the column, but it was fairly easy.